Lowering the B.S.

Where did it go?

The other day I woke up dreaming about bagels. I was never a big bread person, but when I passed Bruegger’s recently it smelled awfully good. As it stands, I haven’t had any bread since this past summer. That is when my Blood Sugar was over 500, and diabetes was diagnosed: Uber B.S.

I don’t know where it has gone, but the recent readings are not those of a diabetic. In fact, a couple hours after having 2 large grapefruits, I was only reading in the 130’s. What is up?

I don’t proclaim to be cured. This is a fairly recent phenomenon, and the test of time hasn’t freed me of my medically diagnosed permanent malady. Still, this is a matter which calls for further investigation.

Here are the average readings, over these time periods:

30 Days: 128.

14 Days: 114.

7 Days: 104.

My blood pressure has consistently been in the 120’s over about 84. Fairly normal by most standards. Isn’t it curious the medical community becomes concerned when a diabetic patient has the slightest elevation in blood pressure? Until my 84 drops down 4 points, my doctor is required to recommend blood pressure medication. The volumes speak for themselves: Those that sell drugs to the medical community are motivating doctors to lower the threshold for needing drugs – – just as a precaution.

What is the precautionary requisite? Is there anything cautionary about it? One thing is clear: if you don’t take the medicine, they won’t make any money off you. That would certainly raise ‘cautionary’ flags from the financial sector of the pharmaceutical behemoth.

My doctor – though he understands and readily admits there is nothing wrong with my blood pressure – suggested blood pressure ‘medicine’. The problem, however, isn’t the pressure in my blood. The pressure put on the medical community from their pharmaceutical bedfellows? This desperately needs to be ‘monitored’.

Can we get someone to create a monitoring machine for this?

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